Latest News: Posts Tagged ‘digital’

“Rich in erudite analysis and topical relevance” – THE DIGITAL CRITIC reviewed at The Lifted Brow

Monday, May 7th, 2018

In 2006, I interviewed the British author and journalist Jon Ronson in a North London café as part of my dissertation for an MA in Journalism. At one point, we talked about the critical reaction to his 2001 book Them: Adventures with Extremists, with Ronson expressing his delight that the book was featured as the lead review on the website Salon.

This was the first time I had experienced a notable literary figure celebrating the prestige of an online book review. And I admit that, with this awareness coming in 2006, I may have been a little late to the party (the actual Salon review of Them was published in 2002), but it was thanks to this exchange with Ronson that I began to see online literary criticism as something to be taken seriously and which could offer similar analytical standards, intellectual rigour and stylistic richness to print reviews.

Read the full review here.

“The time has grown ripe for the kind of theoretical and practical analyses collected in THE DIGITAL CRITIC”: A review in the Times Literary Supplement

Friday, March 23rd, 2018

Read the full review here.

“Illuminating at every turn”: Litro reviews THE DIGITAL CRITIC

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

This is a collection of essays that I would like every bookseller, book blogger, book reviewer, arts page editor, and minister for the arts to read. The Internet has revolutionised how we think, read, and write; for good or for ill, it’s a phenomenon to which readers and critics should be paying close attention. With consistently solid writing and argumentation, and a rich diversity of opinion and focus, The Digital Critic is illuminating at every turn.

Read the full review here.

THE DIGITAL CRITIC reviewed in Berfrois

Thursday, February 22nd, 2018

What is it about the predicament of digital writing and reading that has so many literary provocateurs abuzz? “Mies van der Rohe said, ‘The least is the most.’ I agree with him completely,’” John Cage wrote in his diary. “At the same time, what concerns me now is quantity.” Cage was becoming more concerned with social activities rather than music. He was reading Marshall McLuhan, Buckminster Fuller and Norman O. Brown. Cage was “concerned with improving the world.” He was beginning to think that “the disciplines…must now be practiced socially” (A Year From Monday, 1967).

Read the full review here Berfrois.

The Irish Times calls THE DIGITAL CRITIC “accessible and comprehensive at once.”

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Read here.

An excerpt from THE DIGITAL CRITIC appears in Review 31

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Read here.

Joanna Walsh’s essay from THE DIGITAL CRITIC appears in Los Angeles Review of Books

Thursday, December 14th, 2017

Read here.

“The Re-Birth of the Author.” Theodora Hawlin’s essay from THE DIGITAL CRITIC appears in The Quietus

Friday, November 17th, 2017

Read here.

Kirkus recommends THE DIGITAL CRITIC for “readers working in that Venn diagram space where writing, publishing, and cyberspace come together.”

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

Read here.